A few months ago, I spent the day in Shipley Hill and Yale Heights, two of my favorite Baltimore neighborhoods.  Lots of interesting architecture, beautiful once-grand homes, tidy smaller homes — and yes, lots of blight, unfortunately.

I came across a curious group of buildings — obviously an old factory complex, one of the buildings still had the address painted on the front facade:  101 Willard Street.  Upon arriving home, I immediately looked to see who owned this property — and what did it used to be?

Imagine my surprise to find the address no longer exists…in fact, the odd site of the 100 block of Willard Street is missing altogether. Yet, I stood there, right in front of 101.  Hmmm.

100 block, Willard Street, odd side.
100 block, Willard Street, odd side.

Turns out, the factory complex was the former Eigenbrot Brewery, featured in several articles, including this one from the City Paper.

100 block, Willard Street, odd side.
100 block, Willard Street, odd side.

There are quite a few old photos online that show the brewery complex in its former glory, until it closed in 1920.  A mattress company moved in at one time, along with a moving and storage company — both have also closed their doors.  It’s a shame to see this once-grand set of buildings (101-107 Willard Street) fall into such terrible disrepair.

100 block, Willard street, odd side.
100 block, Willard street, odd side.

When researching who actually owns these buildings — which is no easy feat, considering they no longer officially exist — I came across this curiosity…a tilapia farm that claims to be using one of the buildings as its principal place of business.  If this business exists, I have no idea where it is, as all the buildings I saw were dilapidated, and certainly not fit to be used for a business — although, it’s possible that I missed something.

The LLC that owned the building is not in good standing with the state, and their charter has been forfeited.  The resident agent for the LLC owned (or still owns) several blighted or lead paint-filled homes around town — very curious, indeed.

It would be nice to see these buildings restored — if anyone has any information on them, or their future — please let me know!